Managing your symptoms
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Pacing and energy management

Pacing and energy management

The information set out on this page about pacing is not necessarily a recommendation. Instead, we aim to support you to make an informed decision about which symptom management approach you may or may not want to consider trying.

Pacing is a self-management technique. Self-management is a broad description of a combination of knowledge, skills and strategies which people can use to reduce the impact of a health problem on their quality of life.

Pacing as self-management should not be seen as a treatment, but more as a way of coping with the impact of M.E. Taking a balanced, steady approach to activity counteracts any tendency to overdo things. Keeping your activity levels within sensible limits avoids overly aggravating your symptoms and prolonging the recovery phase after the increased activity.

You also know that if the activity is within your limits, you have a realistic chance of achieving the activity as planned. Understanding and accepting what your current abilities are helps you to plan ahead with more confidence. Over time, if your condition stabilises, you can choose to try, if you feel able, to very gradually increase your activities to work towards improvement.

Action for M.E.’s 2019 Big Survey of more than 4,000 people with M.E. asked them questions about a number of symptom management approaches, including pacing. We found that most respondents (88%) had tried pacing in the past five years. Of these:

  • 70% said that they use pacing to do what they feel able to within their manageable limit
  • One in five (20%) said they used pacing to successfully help gradually increase activity, while one in three (30%) said they tried to do so, but it was unmanageable.

Your step-by-step pacing guide

Fully revised and updated for 2020, our detailed Pacing for people with M.E. booklet is based on the expertise and experience of people with M.E. and Pete Gladwell, Clinical Specialist Physiotherapist, Bristol NHS M.E./CFS Service, plus data and insights from our 2019 Big Survey. One survey respondent told us:

“It is very personal and every individual will need their own version of pacing in my opinion. It’s very relative to ‘life before’ – and we were all different then, too! Lots of different factors to consider, it’s a simple concept but application is tricky. Lots of trial and error.”

Our booklet explains pacing as part of self-management, with a step-by-step pacing guide plus daily and weekly planning, pacing versus real life, explaining M.E. and pacing to others, and managing stumbling blocks. People with M.E. who contributed to told us they wanted a detailed reference guide, which means our guide is long by necessity.

  • The essentials of pacing are covered on pages 14 to 27 in the “Your step-by-step pacing guide” section.
  • Other things you may find useful in your self-management toolkit come under the “Pacing as part of self-management” section (pages 28 to 52).

We appreciate that some people find a much briefer guide more useful, such as the pacing factsheet published by Emerge (an Australian charity we work with as part of the International Alliance for M.E.), and we would love to hear from you about what you have found most helpful. If you have feedback about this or any Action for M.E. resources, please do get in touch.


A note about terminology

Balancing out activity and rest is sometimes called “energy management,” “activity management” or simply “pacing,” which is the term Action for M.E. – and the people we support – most often use. “Energy management” is a term more often used by health professionals, as it includes more than just pacing, such as planning and prioritising and managing sleep.

It’s important to note that pacing can mean different things to different people. Some clinicians consider pacing to be about carefully managing activity and other stressors to avoid post-exertional malaise. You may also hear references to the “energy envelope” theory, which is about keeping the activities you undertake within your available energy levels. The majority of our Pacing for people with M.E. booklet focuses on this sort of pacing.

The NICE guideline for M.E. (undergoing essential updates, though this process is on hold due to the Coronavirus pandemic) says: “In this guideline, pacing is defined as energy management, with the aim of maximising cognitive and physical activity, while avoiding setbacks/relapses due to overexertion. The keys to pacing are knowing when to stop and rest by listening to and understanding one’s own body, taking a flexible approach and staying within one’s limits; different people use different techniques to do this.”

Other clinicians consider pacing a way to first stabilise then gradually build up increases in activity, sometimes called “pacing up," which we also cover in our pacing booklet. As with any symptom management approach, pacing up, or not, is your choice. Our 2019 Big Survey (see above) found that around one in five respondents successfully increased activity through pacing up, with one in three saying that they tried gradually to do this, but found it unmanageable.