Useful resources

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Peer mentoring guide

This resource is for anyone considering facilitating peer mentoring for people living with or caring for someone with M.E./CFS. Much of it will be applicable to other fluctuating and/or energy-limiting health conditions, including Long Covid. It shares learning from Action for M.E.’s five-year Mentor M.E. peer-mentoring project, setting out how we approached this, and some tools that might be helpful.

M.E. training for GPs: template letter

Use our template letter to signpost your GP to Dr Nina Muirhead's CPD-accredited free online learning module on the diagnosis and management of M.E. It's based on clinical case studies, and reflects emerging biomedical evidence alongside patients' perspective. The module is complemented by our Learn about M.E. podcast, with input from patients Anna and Craig, about the positive difference that good care and support has made for them, alongside insight from Dr Muirhead and GP Claire Wood.

This is M.E. (Word version)

People with M.E. can use this resource to help their carer or other support professional understand how M.E. impacts them, and the best ways to support them. This is a working draft and we would love your feedback. We have also made a PDF version that you can print easily.

Why I'm eligible for the free flu jab

Given that M.E. is a neurological condition, people with M.E. should be eligible for a free flu jab according to government guidance in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. However, this isn’t quite as straightforward as it should be, and we do hear from people whose GPs consider them not eligible. We have produced a resource you can share with your health professional about this, which also signposts to further information for doctors, including an online learning module about M.E.

Covid-19 vaccine priority groups: template letter

In the advice on Covid-19 vaccine prioritisation from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI), priority group 6 includes people with “underlying health conditions [including…] chronic neurological disease.” This template letter you can share with your GP highlights how, given that the World Health Organisation classifies M.E./CFS as a neurological condition (under Post-Viral Fatigue Syndrome), as does NHS England and SNOMED, having M.E. puts you in priority group 6. Updated on Thursday 10 February to include the latest from the JCVI on this issue.

This is M.E. (PFD version)

People with M.E. can use this resource to help their carer or other support professional understand how M.E. impacts them, and the best ways to support them. This is a working draft and we would love your feedback. We have also made a version in Word that you can download to complete electronically.

Assessing people with M.E. under the Mental Health Act

M.E. is not a mental health condition, and so should not be used as the basis for detention under the Mental Health Act. However, a small minority of people with M.E. are being considered for assessment for detention under the Mental Health Act, or being detained, each year. This factsheet explains what assessment and detention involves, and what your rights are if detained, if you are an adult living in England and Wales.

Taming the gorilla: a guide to living and learning with M.E.

This guide is based on workshops and conversations with 16 people, who between them have more than 100 years of combined experience of living with mild, moderate and severe M.E., and whose stories are woven throughout. All took part in Action for M.E.’s Living and learning with M.E. project in Scotland in 2016.